More Good Poll Results for Mitt Romney

by Pejman Yousefzadeh on October 9, 2012

And these have direct consequences for the electoral college contest:

The full Swing State tracking update offers Rasmussen Reader subscribers a combined view of the results from 11 key states won by President Obama in 2008 and thought to be competitive in 2012. The states collectively hold 146 Electoral College votes and include Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. . . .

[. . .]

In the 11 swing states, Mitt Romney earns 49% support to Obama’s 47%. One percent (1%) likes another candidate, and three percent (3%) are undecided.

This is the first time Romney has led the daily Swing State Survey since September 19. Until today, the president had led for 17 of the previous 19 days, and the candidates had been tied twice. This survey is based on findings from the previous seven days, with most of the responses now coming since Romney’s debate win last Wednesday night.

Forty-six percent (46%) of these Swing State voters are now “certain” they will vote for Romney and will not change their minds. Forty percent (40%) are certain they will vote for the president.

In 2008, Obama won these states by a combined margin of 53% to 46%, virtually identical to his national margin.

American Research Group has Romney ahead by one point in Ohio despite Democrats outnumbering Republicans in the sample by nine percentage points. And then there is Pennsylvania:

Mitt Romney’s strong performance in the first presidential debate may have put Pennsylvania back in play, and closed the gap with President Obama in other battleground states.

A Siena Research Institute Poll on Tuesday showed the Republican nominee trailing Mr. Obama by only three percentage points, 43 percent to 40 percent, in the Keystone State. Other polls prior to the debate had shown Mr. Obama with as much as a 12-point lead.

“Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes suddenly appear to be up for grabs,” said poll director Don Levy. “Romney not only has Republican support but now leads in vote-rich areas outside of Philadelphia and also in the central part of the state. With a month and two more debates to go, Pennsylvania’s direction on the road to the White House remains in doubt.”

The Siena survey found 12 percent of the state’s voters undecided. The poll was conducted from Oct. 1 to Oct. 5; the debate took place on Oct. 3.

Read on for information regarding Wisconsin and Michigan–both looking much better for Romney thanks to the first debate. This race has become very interesting, hasn’t it?

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