Stop the Blogosphere! I Actually Agree With Andrew Sullivan!

by Pejman Yousefzadeh on February 14, 2011

The onetime cheerleader-in-chief of the Obama Administration appears to be souring on the President and his team over the budget:

. . . this president is too weak, too cautious, too beholden to politics over policy to lead. In this budget, in his refusal to do anything concrete to tackle the looming entitlement debt, in his failure to address the generational injustice, in his blithe indifference to the increasing danger of default, he has betrayed those of us who took him to be a serious president prepared to put the good of the country before his short term political interests. Like his State of the Union, this budget is good short term politics but such a massive pile of fiscal [male bovine excrement; we like to keep this a family blog if we can--ed.] it makes it perfectly clear that Obama is kicking this vital issue down the road.

To all those under 30 who worked so hard to get this man elected, know this: he just screwed you over. He thinks you’re fools. Either the US will go into default because of Obama’s cowardice, or you will be paying far far more for far far less because this president has no courage when it counts. He let you down. On the critical issue of America’s fiscal crisis, he represents no hope and no change. Just the same old Washington politics he once promised to end.

Sullivan piles on here. He actually screws up the courage to take on Josh Marshall, who has decided to emulate the popular portrayal of Dick Cheney by blithely pronouncing that deficits don’t matter. And if that is not enough, Sullivan joins me in appreciating the virtues of Mitch Daniels.

To be sure, Sullivan has had a tendency of dropping his political crushes like hot rocks, so I am kind of not surprised to see this happen, assuming that posts like these mark the end of the Daily Dish’s efforts to act as an arm of the White House’s political operations team. And as Patterico notes, the difference between those of us who have been longtime Obama skeptics on the one hand, and Sullivan on the other, “is that Sullivan appears to be surprised.” But forget all of that; for the moment, I want to savor the fact that I have no fight whatsoever to pick with the Daily Dish . . . assuming, of course, that Sullivan doesn’t now expect me to join him in investigating Trig Palin’s matrilineal line.

UPDATE (2/15/2011): Well, so much for that. Sullivan is back to meep-meeping, claiming that the President is playing 36-dimensional chess, and assuring us that the President is “the best chance we’ve had in a long time to address our real problems in a civil and constructive way.” This despite having issued the above excerpt about the President. Apparently, Sullivan just didn’t mean it.

Other bad habits aren’t being abandoned by the Daily Dish either.

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  • http://twitter.com/pohdiaries TWB

    I’m skeptical that Sullivan has completely fallen out of love with Obama. I mean who knows, yesterday was Valentines Day, he could have been in a bad mood for reasons we need not discuss here.

  • Instapundit2

    You may remember that Sullivan was bailed out of trouble relating drug possession by the White House. So I too am skeptical….he owes them, even if he’s in a temporary funk!

  • http://www.codemonkeyramblings.com Mike T

    There was a lot that could have been said in response to Marshall. Someone should point out that even if the majority don’t care about the deficit, we are a republic, not a democracy. Therefore the “will of the people” is nothing more than “advice” to the Congress. They have a higher duty to this country than giving a plurality of polled idiots their way, and part of that duty is keeping the ship of state fiscally secure.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ALU3C54NEK4EQSJOVA2XOK3ILI Alan

    Well what were you expecting, Sully? Expecting budgetary restraint from an ACORN organizer? That’s like asking Wes Craven to produce children’s television.

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