It Needs To Be Said Again

by Pejman Yousefzadeh on November 2, 2009

Barack Obama is not a popular President:

A year on from a historic election, the spirit of popular goodwill that yielded America’s first black president has retreated to tepid support for Barack Obama as he presses his change agenda.

Since the November 4 poll, Obama’s visage has been everywhere, conspicuously on the streets of the nation’s capital where millions of foreign and domestic tourists have visited over the past year, many of them snatching up poignant souvenirs.

A quick look around downtown Washington confirms that the Obama trinkets are still for sale, but more than one strategically placed street hawker have found little point in displaying the T-shirts, posters, and “Yes We Can” buttons bearing the new president’s image.

“They stay in the truck,” grumbled a vendor who identified himself as “Dick,” as he pointed to a rusty vehicle behind him. “They don’t sell anymore.”

[. . .]

In the aftermath of his inauguration in January, Obama’s approval rating soared to 70 percent. Early on, he tested Americans’ faith by diving headlong into controversial programs to rescue the economy, including bailing out sinking US auto manufacturers and unleashing a 787-billion-dollar stimulus plan.

In late April, at the end of the first 100 days in office, Obama still enjoyed more positive reviews than his predecessors in the previous 20 years.

But the fall was soon to come as questions started simmering about the president’s ability to pull the US economy out of a nosedive.

In July, his popularity dipped even below that of predecessor George W. Bush in the same period of his presidency.

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