Maybe I Typed Too Soon

by Pejman Yousefzadeh on August 16, 2009

Maybe–my last post notwithstanding–the White House will be perfectly happy to send Kent Conrad a Christmas card this year. After all, it may well be that he is helping the White House climb down from its earlier insistence on the public option:

Health and Human Services Department Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Sunday said private insurers would face competition under the Obama administration’s health plan, but that an alternative option wouldn’t necessarily have to be government run.

“I think what’s important is choice and competition, and I’m convinced at the end of the day, the plan will have both of those,” said Ms. Sebelius, speaking Sunday morning on CNN’s “State of the Union.” A federal government-run alternative plan is not the “essential element.”

The issue has emerged as a political sticking point as the Obama administration intensifies its efforts to build support in Congress, and among the American public, for legislation to overhaul the health-care system. President Barack Obama has said he would like a public plan to compete with private ones, but the idea has run into strong opposition from insurance companies, Republicans and others.

Ms. Sebelius’s comments left open the door to the idea of having nonprofit cooperatives serve as an alternative to private plans. Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) and others in the Senate have backed such an approach.

And more. I guess that the netroots and the liberal base shouldn’t just be mad at Kent Conrad. They should be mad at the Obama Administration as well.

And perhaps, it should come as no surprise that they would have reason to be angry. Barack Obama, after all, is not the Messiah. He is just another politician, and as such, he will be willing to betray his base as eagerly as other Democrats have been in the past.

  • HSR0601

    Why NOT ?

    1. In an effort to avoid inaction & bankruptcy, there is no denying Single-Payer Plan is the most cost-effective way, and the Public / Private Option is a partial adoption of it. At present, roughly 20 million of the uninsured are young adults, the possible enrollees of lower costs, accordingly, this partial adoption could be more cost-effective than the full one by ratio.

    2. As common sense goes, in terms of fire, preventing it ahead or containing it in earlier phase is the most sensible cost containment of all, and the essential and most cost-saving preventive care programs call for expansive investments of non-profit.

    3. One of three pillars in a new foundation, this health care redesign, to be sure, is going to lead to much-needed massive job creation.

    4. We need to accept Sebelius' remark this way; If the death panel is true, she is willing to open the door for deficit-driven nonsense.

    5. Good News !

    A staff writer at The New Yorker and some experts have examined Medicare data from the successful hospitals of 10 regions, and they have found evidence that more effective, lower-cost care is possible. Thankfully, the provisions in the reform include more expansive policies than they have.

    Please be 'sure' to visit http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/13/opinion/13gaw… for credible evidences !

    Some have followed the Mayo model with salaried doctors employed, Other regions, too, have found ways to protect patients against the pursuit of revenues over patient.
    And a cardiac surgeon of them said they had adopted electronic systems, examined the data and found that a shocking portion of tests were almost certainly unnecessary, possibly harmful.

    According to analysis, their quality scores are well above average. Yet they spend more than $1,500 (16 percent) less per Medicare patient than the national average and have a slower real annual growth rate (3 percent versus 3.5 percent nationwide).

    Surprisingly, 16 % of about $550 billion (the total of medicare cost per year) is around $88 billion per year, except for Medicaid (total cost of around $500 billion per year), medicare 'alone' can save $880 billion over the next decade.

    In addition, under the reform package, along with the already allocated $583 billion, the wastes involving so called “doughnut hole” , the unnecessary subsidies for insurers, abuse, exorbitant costs by the tragic ER visits etc are weeded out, the concern over revenue (below) might be a thing of the past.

    (( Net Medicare and Medicaid savings of $465 billion + the $583 billion revenue package = $1048 billion – the previously estimated $1.042 trillion cost of reform = $6 billion surplus – $245 billion (the 10-year cost of adjusting Medicare reimbursement rates so physicians don’t face big annual pay cuts) = the estimated deficit of $239 billion ))

    In modernized society, the business lacking IT system is unthinkable just like pre-electricity period, nevertheless, the last thing to expect is happening now in the sector requiring the best accuracy in respect to dealing with human lives. Apparently the errors by no e-medical records have spawned the crushing lawsuits (Medical malpractice lawsuits cost at least $150 billion per year), and these costs have led to the unnecessary tests, treatments, even more profits so far. And in different parts of the U.S., patients get two to three times as much care for the same disease, with the same result.

    Thank You !

  • HSR0601

    Why NOT ?

    1. In an effort to avoid inaction & bankruptcy, there is no denying Single-Payer Plan is the most cost-effective way, and the Public / Private Option is a partial adoption of it. At present, roughly 20 million of the uninsured are young adults, the possible enrollees of lower costs, accordingly, this partial adoption could be more cost-effective than the full one by ratio.

    2. As common sense goes, in terms of fire, preventing it ahead or containing it in earlier phase is the most sensible cost containment of all, and the essential and most cost-saving preventive care programs call for expansive investments of non-profit.

    3. One of three pillars in a new foundation, this health care redesign, to be sure, is going to lead to much-needed massive job creation.

    4. We need to accept Sebelius' remark this way; If the death panel is true, she is willing to open the door for deficit-driven nonsense.

    5. Good News !

    A staff writer at The New Yorker and some experts have examined Medicare data from the successful hospitals of 10 regions, and they have found evidence that more effective, lower-cost care is possible. Thankfully, the provisions in the reform include more expansive policies than they have.

    Please be 'sure' to visit http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/13/opinion/13gaw… for credible evidences !

    Some have followed the Mayo model with salaried doctors employed, Other regions, too, have found ways to protect patients against the pursuit of revenues over patient.
    And a cardiac surgeon of them said they had adopted electronic systems, examined the data and found that a shocking portion of tests were almost certainly unnecessary, possibly harmful.

    According to analysis, their quality scores are well above average. Yet they spend more than $1,500 (16 percent) less per Medicare patient than the national average and have a slower real annual growth rate (3 percent versus 3.5 percent nationwide).

    Surprisingly, 16 % of about $550 billion (the total of medicare cost per year) is around $88 billion per year, except for Medicaid (total cost of around $500 billion per year), medicare 'alone' can save $880 billion over the next decade.

    In addition, under the reform package, along with the already allocated $583 billion, the wastes involving so called “doughnut hole” , the unnecessary subsidies for insurers, abuse, exorbitant costs by the tragic ER visits etc are weeded out, the concern over revenue (below) might be a thing of the past.

    (( Net Medicare and Medicaid savings of $465 billion + the $583 billion revenue package = $1048 billion – the previously estimated $1.042 trillion cost of reform = $6 billion surplus – $245 billion (the 10-year cost of adjusting Medicare reimbursement rates so physicians don’t face big annual pay cuts) = the estimated deficit of $239 billion ))

    In modernized society, the business lacking IT system is unthinkable just like pre-electricity period, nevertheless, the last thing to expect is happening now in the sector requiring the best accuracy in respect to dealing with human lives. Apparently the errors by no e-medical records have spawned the crushing lawsuits (Medical malpractice lawsuits cost at least $150 billion per year), and these costs have led to the unnecessary tests, treatments, even more profits so far. And in different parts of the U.S., patients get two to three times as much care for the same disease, with the same result.

    Thank You !

Previous post:

Next post: