House Democrats Rebel Against Health Care Taxes

by Pejman Yousefzadeh on July 17, 2009

I had thought that the tax scheme attached to the House health care plan would, at the very least, survive a vote outside of the House. Sure, it might get killed in the Senate, or in conference, but I figured that Nancy Pelosi would be able to carry her chamber.

Maybe not:

Twenty-one freshman Democratic House members have signed a letter opposing their leadership’s plan to raise taxes to finance a healthcare overhaul.

Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) circulated the letter, saying that the income surtax on the wealthy would place an undue burden on small businesses, some of which pay taxes in the same way as an individual. The letter had 22 signers, all freshmen except for Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.), who is in his second term.

“Especially in a recession, we need to make sure not to kill the goose that will lay the golden eggs of our recovery,” the letter said. “We are concerned that this will discourage entrepreneurial activity.”

At this point, I wonder if the House is just going to have to go back to the drawing board. Democratic defections from its plan appear to be increasing.

  • HSR0601

    -Democrats pushing for health care reform got serious jolts last week from critics who warned that their proposed legislation would 'do little to slow spiraling health care costs'. A group of conservative Democrats vowed that they would join Republicans-

    Blue Dogs Rake in the Dollars from the Health Care Industry … The 20 Blue Dogs have taken a combined $6,849,273 from various segments of the health care industry, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics

  • HSR0601

    -Democrats pushing for health care reform got serious jolts last week from critics who warned that their proposed legislation would 'do little to slow spiraling health care costs'. A group of conservative Democrats vowed that they would join Republicans-

    Blue Dogs Rake in the Dollars from the Health Care Industry … The 20 Blue Dogs have taken a combined $6,849,273 from various segments of the health care industry, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics

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